Can I Drink Well Water?

 

 

Can I Drink Well Water?

If you are living somewhere with access to well water, you might be thinking about whether or not you can drink it as is.  Is it safe to drink without a filter?  What makes well water different from municipal services that are out there?  Here’s what you’re going to need to know about well water and its role in your health.

 

The stats on well water

Many, many households rely on well water as their primary source of drinking.  The best estimate is that it is used in over 13 million households!  While they aren’t regulated by the same people who do the municipal services, they are carefully monitored by local legislation and testing boards.  

Well water can have bacteria and contaminants.  These include microorganisms such as parasites and bacteria.  These would be in small sizes, of course, but if you are immunocompromised or simply likely to get sick, it’s important to know.

Well water also can have heavy metals, organic chemicals, and fluoride .  All of these are considered “normal” in small doses, but if you are drinking this regularly as your main water sources, these are all considered risky.  

 

How is well water treated?

It makes sense, then, that well water should be treated, right?  You’re absolutely right.  Water softeners and distillation systems are popular for removing a lot of sediment and chemicals from the water.  These are standard in most wells, though you won’t find them installed on a lot of older homes.

In most living districts, the well water is tested regularly for safety as far as heavy metals, and other dangerous chemicals.  If the water is deemed unsafe, you might have to have your well re-done somewhere else on your property to get better water.  Or, consider switching to another water source (if applicable).

 

So what should I do?

As long as your well water meets all of those parameters, you are perfectly safe to drink it.  It is tested regularly and it means that you can continue to trust it until those test results come back telling you otherwise.   However, you do have other options available to you, too.  Namely: home water filters.  There are many different kinds, including filtration jugs, under sink filters, and even portable countertop filters.  The whole goal is to pick a filter that works for you.

It’s actually more common these days to look at the idea of water filtering systems for your home when you're on a well.  This is because a lot of wells are old and can be prone to having issues.  Since having a new one done is ridiculously expensive and not always a sure thing, it means that you need to do what is best for you as well as your health and safety.  This is what brings most people to consider water filters.  Plus, it’s nice to know that you are simply getting pure, safe water.  

 

Frizzlife water filtration solutions for well water

Frizzlife offers a full line of water filter systems that could treat your well water and serve your family water need perfectly. You could start with pre-filtration systems which could remove most of the large particles from well water. Then you can either go with general carbon filters or reverse osmosis systems for different usage purposes. Apply RO systems for drinking water and use general carbon filters for daily washing purposes. You could also choose portable countertop water filter systems in your bedroom.

 

Conclusion

  Whether you ever decide to drink your well water “straight”, or you just go right for the filtered version of it instead through some sort of filtering system for a modern home, it’s going to be a great choice when you compare it to the whole concept of getting 24-packs of water bottles, or those huge, hard-to-move large household water bottles.  You deserve to have clean and pure water, but it’s up to you just how you decide to enjoy that for your household for the years to come.  It is nice to have the option of both, and at least now you know a bit more about why it’s so popular and important in our modern day world, right?

 

SOURCES

https://www.epa.gov/privatewells 

https://www.epa.gov/privatewells/potential-well-water-contaminants-and-their-impacts 

https://www.cdc.gov/healthywater/drinking/private/wells/treatment.html